Monday, 14 September 2015

Two-Hit Wonders On The Australian Chart - The 00s

JUMP TO: Part 1 II Part 2 II Part 3


What would a look back at a decade's one-hit wonders be without a list of those acts that managed two top 10 singles and no further top 50 appearances? Joining the ranks of Feargal Sharkey, The Hooters, The Proclaimers, Sonia Dada and Gabrielle, these seven performers were at least consistent with their chart hits - even if they could only register two of them.

In the 2000s, it seemed like just about anyone could score a couple of hits

And, it's a pretty eclectic bunch we have in the list for the 2000s - with everyone from a Hollywood actress to a kids' character visiting the top 10 on two separate occasions. And kicking us off, the first singer I did a photo shoot with when I worked at TV Hits magazine. 


Vitamin C
Her first Australian hit was a genius idea - a song released to coincide with the end of school that could be wheeled out year after year. And the graduation theme wasn't the only savvy decision the singer born Colleen Fitzpatrick made, with a Vitamin C lipstick, doll and video game character all part of her brand-building efforts. But just as her music career was picking up steam, with the lead single from second album More also hitting the top 10 (with a little help from "Friends Forever...", which was included on the CD single of "The Itch"), the hits - and, presumably, the marketing spin-offs - dried up.

Hit 1: "Friends Forever (Graduation)"
Entered the Australian chart: September 11, 2000
Peak position: number 2




Hit 2: "The Itch"
Entered the Australian chart: December 11, 2000
Peak position: number 6






Nicole Kidman
If it weren't for her featured artist credit on a few Glee releases, Gwyneth Paltrow would also be on this list. But we'll have to content ourselves with Nicole Kidman, who hit the ARIA chart shortly after Gwyneth's double whammy from Duets ("Cruisin'" and "Bette Davis Eyes") - a reversal from the more common trend of singers turning to acting. Nicole's first top 10 hit was her ballad duet with Ewan McGregor from Moulin Rouge - which was remixed by Josh Abrahams for the single release. Bolstered by the positive reception her singing received, she next teamed up with Robbie Williams for a remake of "Somethin' Stupid", the song made famous by Frank and Nancy Sinatra - inspiring all sorts of tabloid rumours about a steamy affair between the two.

Hit 1: "Come What May" (with Ewan McGregor)
Entered the Australian chart: July 2, 2001
Peak position: number 10




Hit 2: "Somethin' Stupid" (with Robbie Williams)
Entered the Australian chart: February 4, 2002
Peak position: number 8






Bob The Builder
If actors turning to singing wasn't enough for genuine musicians to contend with, 2001 also saw the arrival on the chart of cartoon character Bob The Builder with the theme tune from his animated series, which had been the UK's Christmas number 1 and highest selling single of the year in 2000. Voiced by Neil Morrissey, Bob almost made it to number 1 twice in Australia when a lyrically adjusted update of "Mambo No. 5" reached number 2 just two years after the version by Lou Bega topped the ARIA chart. Bob also scored a number 1 album, but thankfully the craze for the cartoon tradesman - at least in terms of music releases - ended as quickly as it began. 

Hit 1: "Can We Fix It?"
Entered the Australian chart: August 20, 2001
Peak position: number 1




Hit 2: "Mambo No. 5"
Entered the Australian chart: October 29, 2001
Peak position: number 2






Blu Cantrell
Right, back to a real singer - albeit one with a made-up name. Born Tiffany Cobb, Blu Cantrell was one of a number of female performers who succeeded in the early '00s with strongly worded R&B tracks telling men exactly what they thought of them. Like Kandi's "Don't Think I'm Not" and "Case Of The Ex (Whatcha Gonna Do)" by Mya, "Hit 'Em Up Style (Oops!)" dealt frankly with men who cheat - in this case, Blu advised leaving him with nothing. Album number two, Bittersweet, included Blu's second hit, "Breathe", a UK chart-topper which was slightly more mellow in terms of its lyrical content.

Hit 1: "Hit 'Em Up Style (Oops!)"
Entered the Australian chart: September 24, 2001
Peak position: number 3




Hit 2: "Breathe" (featuring Sean Paul)
Entered the Australian chart: July 28, 2003
Peak position: number 8






Kate DeAraugo
Our look back at one-hit wonders from the '00s featured a number of former Australian Idol contestants - including the reality show's least successful winner, Natalie Gauci. Of Idol's seven victors, season three champ Kate DeAraugo comes in fifth in terms of solo chart success. Her two top 10 hits and no further top 50 appearances mean she did better than Natalie, Casey Donovan and Damien Leith on the singles chart, but Damien's six top 20 albums push him ahead of Kate - and probably one or two others - overall. Kate, of course, left her solo career behind when she teamed up with three other ex-contestants to form Young Divas.

Hit 1: "Maybe Tonight"
Entered the Australian chart: December 5, 2005
Peak position: number 1




Hit 2: "Faded"
Entered the Australian chart: February 27, 2006
Peak position: number 8






Sara Bareilles
Had I compiled the list of one-hit wonders in the '00s at any point between the start of 2010 and the end of 2013, singer/songwriter Sara Bareilles would have featured on it. Her breakthrough hit, "Love Song" - which, ironically, was about how she didn't want to do as her record company asked and write a hit single - was her only top 50 appearance until... six years later when "Brave" finally hit the ARIA chart months after its initial release. At this rate, we should expect a number 2 hit from Sara in 2020 (and I reserve the right to edit this post and remove her if she comes through with the goods again at any point).

Hit 1: "Love Song"
Entered the Australian chart: April 7, 2008
Peak position: number 4




Hit 2: "Brave"
Entered the Australian chart: February 3, 2014
Peak position: number 3






Cobra Starship
Likewise, here's one more act that could potentially manage another hit single. Signed by Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz back in the mid-'00s, Cobra Starship released a couple of under-the-radar albums before teaming up with Gossip Girl star Leighton Meester on the lead single for their third album, Hot Mess. Co-written by Kevin Rudolf and one-time American Idol judge Kara DioGuardi, "Good Girls Go Bad" gave the band's electro-rock sound a pop spin - and flew up charts around the world as a result. It took until their next album, Night Shades, for them to repeat the feat, with lead track "You Make Me Feel...". Unfortunately, the pattern of first singles from Cobra Starship albums becoming hits didn't continue as 2014's "Never Been In Love" (featuring Icona Pop) missed the top 50 (and a fifth album has yet to materialise).

Hit 1: "Good Girls Go Bad" (featuring Leighton Meester)
Entered the Australian chart: August 3, 2009
Peak position: number 5




Hit 2: "You Make Me Feel..." (featuring Sabi)
Entered the Australian chart: August 22, 2011
Peak position: number 3






Honourable mentions
As usual, here's a list of the artists who were almost two-hit wonders - if only that second hit had charted a few places higher.
  • Alice Deejay ("Better Off Alone" - number 4, "Back In My Life" - number 19)
  • The All-American Rejects ("Gives You Hell" - number 3, "I Wanna" - number 15)
  • The Androids ("Do It With Madonna" - number 4, "Here She Comes" - number 15)
  • Dixie Chicks ("Landslide" - number 6, "Not Ready To Make Nice" - number 18)
  • Casey Donovan ("Listen With Your Heart" - number 1, "What's Going On?" - number 18)
  • Hinder ("Lips Of An Angel" - number 1, "Better Than Me" - number 11)
  • The Ian Carey Project ("Get Shaky" - number 2, "Last Night" - number 15)
  • Damien Leith ("Night Of My Life" - number 1, "22 Steps" - number 11)
  • James Morrison ("You Give Me Something" - number 7, "I Won't Let You Go" - number 13)
  • Nitty ("Nasty Girl" - number 1, "Hey Bitty" - number 11)
  • Eric Prydz ("Call On Me" - number 2, "Proper Education" - number 20)

I guess that means I'll be doing a list of the one-hit wonders for the 2010s in about a decade's time. Until then, I'll continue my weekly look back at the chart hits from 25 and 30 years ago, and a few other one-off posts. 


Sunday, 13 September 2015

One-Hit Wonders On The Australian Chart - The 00s part 2

JUMP TO: Part 1 II Part 2 II Part 3


At this point in my look back at the one-hit wonders of the 1990s, I braced myself to run through 80 separate acts that all managed one top 10 single and no other appearances inside the ARIA top 50. For the 2000s, we have exactly half that number.

Reality TV winners from around the world only managed one Australian hit

Why the drop-off? One reason: the rise of the collaboration. From rap hits with guest vocalists to new performers being introduced via a featured spot on a song by an established act, an increasing amount of singles in the 2000s were credited to two or more artists. And so, the likes of Angie Stone and 112 won't appear here - although they meet the criteria when it comes to their own releases, they both also featured on a top 50 hit by someone else.

Just to make things more confusing, I haven't included performers who ONLY appeared on a top 10 hit in a featured artist capacity. Sorry Case and Tamia, but unless you were a lead artist on a top 10 hit, I'm not interested. Also not included: one-off charity ensemble Band Aid 20. All that out of the way, here are your B-list one-hit wonders of the 2000s...


"Steal My Sunshine" by Len
Entered the Australian chart: November 8, 1999
Peak position: number 3
No other top 100 entries
We start off with a song that was a hit in Len's home country of Canada as well as the US in 1999 but didn't reach the ARIA top 10 until the start of 2000, when its summertime feel made it the perfect soundtrack for beach trips and pool parties. Using a sample from disco classic "More More More" and inspired by the dual vocals in The Human League's "Don't You Want Me", "Steal My Sunshine" was the lead single from Len's third album - a burst of inspiration in an otherwise hit-less career.





"Shackles (Praise You)" by Mary Mary
Entered the Australian chart: July 24, 2000
Peak position: number 2
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest hit: "I Sings" (number 88 in 2001)
Cliff Richard had brought Christianity back to the chart seven months earlier with "The Millennium Prayer", but this duo comprised of sisters Erica and Tina Atkins-Campbell put the groove back into gospel with their debut single. Since "Shackles", Mary Mary have preached to the converted, with great success on Billboard's gospel chart but no further mainstream hits.





"Dance With Me" by Debelah Morgan
Entered the Australian chart: October 16, 2000
Peak position: number 3
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "I Remember" (number 55 in 2001)
She'd spent the best part of the 1990s being signed to and dropped from record deals, so American singer Debelah Morgan was taking no chances with her latest contract, putting a new twist on the tango staple "Hernando's Hideaway". The familiarity of "Dance With Me" helped the pint-sized performer finally attain that chart hit that had eluded her for so long. Fun fact: I once did a lunchtime interview with Debelah and she ordered a Caesar salad with everything on the side. Cut to the waiter bringing her a bowl of leaves and several ramekins containing the other ingredients.





"Butterfly" by Crazy Town
Entered the Australian chart: March 26, 2001
Peak position: number 4
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Drowning" (number 72 in 2002)
We have Linkin Park to thank for the nu metal explosion of the early 2000s, which saw a whole host of rap/rock bands invade the chart. Driven by its insistent "come my lady, come come my lady" hook, the Red Hot Chili Peppers-sampling "Butterfly" became one of the biggest hits from the genre for the band with members including Shifty, Epic and the late DJ AM.





"Miss California" by Dante Thomas
Entered the Australian chart: October 1, 2001
Peak position: number 5
No other top 100 entries
While Wyclef Jean was the only Fugee who seemed serious about attempting a solo career in the early 2000s, his former band-mate Pras Michel popped up on this debut single by then-23-year-old American Dante Thomas, who Pras had discovered and signed.

 



"Rapture" by iiO
Entered the Australian chart: November 26, 2001
Peak position: number 3
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "At The End" (number 53 in 2002)
Originally called Vaiio - after the similarly spelt Sony laptop - the duo of singer Nadia Ali and producer Markus Moser decided to avoid legal difficulties and shortened their name to iiO ahead of the release of this debut single. Despite sounding like just another big club track out of Europe, iiO actually hailed from America - and even cracked the US top 50 with "Rapture" at a time when dance singles didn't perform so well Stateside.





"Wherever You Will Go" by The Calling
Entered the Australian chart: March 18, 2002
Peak position: number 5
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Adrienne" (number 60 in 2002)
A genre that did continue to dominate American airwaves and charts in the early 2000s was white-bread rock music like Train, Nickelback, Matchbox Twenty and these new kids on the block, who landed the fifth-biggest single of the year in the States with debut single "Wherever You Will Go". Fronted by Alex Band, who looked like he'd just stepped out of a boy band but sounded like Chad Kroeger or Scott Stapp, The Calling were never able to live up to the success of this song, not even gracing the Billboard Hot 100 with their presence again.





"Way Of The World" by Francesca
Entered the Australian chart: August 26, 2002
Peak position: number 3
No other top 100 entries
The younger sister of Anna Belperio from Popstars winners Scandal'us (yes, they had two hits), Francesca owes her appearance on this list to a youth initiative called SNAP (Say No And Phone) and a concert held in her hometown of Adelaide to support the cause. Like Hillsong events, selling the "Way Of The World" single at the gig qualified as a chart store and that one rush of sales resulted in her entering the chart at number 3. It also meant the song fell out of the top 100 the following week - making Francesca the briefest one-hit wonder of all time.





"She Hates Me" by Puddle Of Mudd
Entered the Australian chart: November 11, 2002
Peak position: number 9
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Blurry" (number 52 in 2002)
More post-grunge American rock now - and another song that derived much of its success from the fact that it drops an F-bomb or 10, although not in the sanitised radio-friendly version, of course. "She Hates Me" became one of an increasing number of chart hits to have swear words unsubtly silenced in "clean" versions that sat side-by-side on CD singles with the "explicit" versions. For me, the almost novelty-ish "She Hates Me" was nowhere near as good as "Blurry", which was an even bigger hit for the band in the US and the UK.





"Don't Know Why" by Norah Jones
Entered the Australian chart: March 3, 2003
Peak position: number 5
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Here We Go Again" (with Ray Charles) (number 51 in 2005)
She may have no trouble regularly placing albums in the top 5, but this multi-Grammy Award-winning debut single is easy listening star Norah Jones's only hit in Australia. It's also a cover version, having been originally recorded by its writer, Jesse Harris, in 1999.





"You Promised Me (Tu Es Foutu)" by In-Grid
Entered the Australian chart: March 17, 2003
Peak position: number 7
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "In-Tango (We Tango Alone)" (number 63 in 2003)
The list of '90s one-hit wonders was full of trashy Eurodance acts, but Italian Ingrid Alberini is our sole purveyor of Continental party tracks for the '00s. "You Promised Me" was the English version of In-Grid's European hit, "Tu Es Foutu" - a song that, bizarrely, was actually in French and bore a title that translates politely as "you're screwed". 






"United States Of Whatever" by Liam Lynch
Entered the Australian chart: June 2, 2003
Peak position: number 6
No other top 100 entries
At just under a minute-and-a-half, this is easily the shortest song on this list - and also the silliest. Recorded by Liam Lynch (real name: William Niederst) in one take, the frenetic burst of joke rock was brief enough not to wear out its welcome, as it poked fun at America's culture of disaffected youth. Musician and director Liam Lynch had previously been involved with MTV's sock puppet series, The Sifl and Olly Show, which had featured Zafo - the only character in the song not to get a "whatever!".





"Angel" by Amanda Perez
Entered the Australian chart: July 21, 2003
Peak position: number 2
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "I Like It" (number 54 in 2004)
Stuck behind The Black Eyed Peas' chart-topper "Where Is The Love?" for four weeks, "Angel" was the title track and lead single from Amanda Perez's second album. The Mexican-American singer has released three more albums with decreasing sales in the years since this breakthrough smash.





"Unchained Melody" by Gareth Gates
Entered the Australian chart: July 28, 2003
Peak position: number 9
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Sunshine" (number 60 in 2003)
Pop Idol didn't even air here in Australia and so the fact that season one runner-up Gareth Gates managed to hit the ARIA top 10 - more than a year after he topped the UK chart with this debut single - is all down to song choice: a snoozesome cover of the ubiquitous The Righteous Brothers classic. By the end of 2003, Gareth's music career was already on the skids at home, which put paid to future chart action in Australia - but the spiky-haired teen heartthrob still has one up on Pop Idol victor Will Young, who still hasn't reached the Australian chart despite a string of hit singles and albums in the UK that continues to this day.





"Take Me To The Clouds Above" by LMC (vs U2)
Entered the Australian chart: April 5, 2004
Peak position: number 7
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "You Get What You Give" (vs New Radicals) (number 60 in 2005)
Obviously on this list thanks to the first part of the artist credit, dance group LMC got its name from its members: producers Lee Monteverde, Matt Cadman and Cris Nuttall. Sung by house diva Rachel McFarlane, "Take Me To The Clouds Above" featured a lyrical hook from Whitney Houston's "How Will I Know" and a musical sample taken from "With Or Without You" by U2 - thus the second part of the artist credit.





"Four To The Floor" by Starsailor
Entered the Australian chart: April 26, 2004
Peak position: number 5
No other top 100 entries
Next up, a song that became a hit thanks to Stuart Price's Thin White Duke remix, which transformed the indie rock original version into a storming club track and FM radio staple in the mid-'00s. Despite only charting in Australia the one time, the band enjoyed a string of 10 consecutive top 40 hits in the UK, all of which will be found on their greatest hits album, Good Souls, which is released this week.





"I Don't Wanna Know" by Mario Winans (featuring Enya and P.Diddy)
Entered the Australian chart: May 31, 2004
Peak position: number 2
No other top 100 entries
After years working as a producer for Puff Daddy's Bad Boy label, Mario Winans got around to releasing his second album (his first had been under a previous deal with Motown) in 2004 and roped in his boss (now going by P.Diddy) as a guest rapper on lead single "I Don't Wanna Know". Also claiming a credit on the song was Enya, whose 1987 instrumental "Boadicea" had been sampled by The Fugees on "Ready Or Not", which in turn was the basis for Mario's track. As we saw in Part 1, answer tracks were big business in 2004 - and a response to "I Don't Wanna Know" came via The Pirates' UK top 10 single, "You Should Really Know".





"Tipsy" by J-Kwon
Entered the Australian chart: June 14, 2004
Peak position: number 5
No other top 100 entries
Talk about peaking early. The rapper born Jerrell Jones was 17 going on 18 when his debut single, "Tipsy", became a worldwide hit and he still hasn't turned 30. In retrospect, it might have been a slight bit irresponsible for us to run the songwords to this ode to underage drinking in Smash Hits at the time.





"Heartbreaker" by Kayne Taylor
Entered the Australian chart: June 28, 2004
Peak position: number 8
No other top 100 entries
Not even the rebranding of Popstars to Popstars Live - in an attempt to emulate the runaway success of Australian Idol - could save what was by now a dying franchise. And as if to prove the point, winner Kayne Taylor barely scraped into the top 10 with his winner's single, "Heartbreaker". The Australia Post worker-turned-reality show champ's only other chart appearance was on "Stand Up Next To Me" by his season's finalists, which fell some way short of doing for Popstars what "Rise Up" had done for Idol





"I Believe" by Fantasia
Entered the Australian chart: July 26, 2004
Peak position: number 4
No other top 100 entries
I'm pretty sure Channel 10 didn't air the first two seasons of American Idol locally - and although it would've been great to see Kelly Clarkson triumph as the inaugural winner, season three was a pretty good place to start. Fantasia Barrino was my favourite throughout the season and, for me, there was really no competition when it came to the final, when she was up against Diana DeGarmo. The voting public of America thought differently, and Fantasia won by a margin of only two percent and got to release winner's single "I Believe". For once, the song was actually pretty good - a stirring ballad accompanied by a swaying gospel choir that raspy-voiced Fantasia, to coin a phrase, nailed. Unfortunately, her follow-up material didn't live up to the promise she showed on Idol - and I should know, since I bought Fantasia's first two albums.





"Underwear Goes Inside The Pants" by Lazyboy
Entered the Australian chart: January 24, 2005
Peak position: number 5
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Inhale Positivity" (number 78 in 2005)
As one-quarter of Aqua, Søren Rasted had been part of some of the biggest chart hits of the '90s, but the Danish musician and producer's side-project, Lazyboy, can only lay claim to this one success story. Featuring the spoken vocals of comedian Greg Giraldo, "Underwear Goes Inside The Pants" details everything that's wrong with the world - particularly the United States - and kind of felt like the antidote to the positivity of the similarly styled "Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunscreen".





"Evie" by The Wrights
Entered the Australian chart: March 7, 2005
Peak position: number 2
No other top 100 entries
A veritable who's who of Aussie rock stars, this supergroup comprised members of Jet, Powderfinger, Grinspoon, Spiderbait, The Living End and more, banding together for a remake of The Easybeats' three-part epic, "Evie". Performed at Wave Aid in January 2005, the one-off single also raised money for victims of the Boxing Day tsunami, with some proceeds donated to Easybeats singer Steve Wright, who gave the ensemble their name, and the Salvation Army. 

 



"Stop The Music" by P-Money (with Scribe)
Entered the Australian chart: April 18, 2005
Peak position: number 7
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Everything" (featuring Vince Harder) (number 85 in 2008)
Now, we get to a couple of songs that might be contentious inclusions. New Zealand hip-hop acts P-Money (DJ/producer Peter Wadams) and Scribe (rapper Malo Luafutu) both crossed the Tasman to score Australian chart success in the mid-'00s - but only Scribe managed to achieve top 50 entries besides their collaboration on "Stop The Music". Although P-Money did write and produce some of Scribe's other hits, his only chart credit as an artist is on "Stop The Music".





"Obsession (No Es Amor)" by Frankie J (featuring Baby Bash)
Entered the Australian chart: April 25, 2005
Peak position: number 5
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Don't Wanna Try" (number 81 in 2003)
Next up, we have singer Frankie J (real name: Francisco Javier Bautista Jr) who collaborated with rapper Baby Bash (real name: Ronnie Bryant) on two top 10 singles - but he didn't receive featured artist billing in Australia on 2004's "Suga Suga". And so, Frankie's only credited chart hit in this country is his own release "Obsession...", one of a handful of covers of a song originally recorded by group Aventura. Interestingly, another remake by boy band 3rd Wish also featured a rap by Baby Bash.





"Crash" by Chloë
Entered the Australian chart: September 12, 2005
Peak position: number 10
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Stars" (number 66 in 2004)
The original version of "Crash", a UK top 10 hit for British indie band The Primitives, didn't make the ARIA top 100, but 17 years later, a cover by up-and-coming Australian singer Chloë achieved the same result in Australia. Following its top 10 debut, the single fell out of the top 100 after its fifth week on the chart - and just as quickly Chloë Stafford's music career was over, with record company Sony Music choosing not to release her album.





"Hit Me Up" by Gia Farrell
Entered the Australian chart: February 5, 2007
Peak position: number 6
No other top 100 entries
Here's another singer who was dropped by her record label - in this case, Atlantic Records - after she landed a top 10 single in Australia. The song in question was "Hit Me Up", which got a leg up from its use in animated film Happy Feet. After years of record company and management wrangling, Gia popped up during the 2012 season of American Idol under her birth name, Jeannie Bocchicchio, but didn't progress beyond Hollywood Week.





"Suddenly I See" by KT Tunstall
Re-entered the Australian chart: February 26, 2007
Peak position: number 6
No other top 100 entries
It might be Scottish singer/songwriter Kate Tunstall's only ARIA chart hit, but it's visited the top 100 on at least three separate occasions - originally reaching number 39 in early 2006 then making it into the top 10 a year later when people were more familiar with it from The Devil Wears Prada. Fittingly, there are also three videos for the songs, one which appears below, another which you can watch by following the link in the song title above and a third which doesn't seem to be on YouTube in Australia.





"If You Don't Mean It" by Dean Geyer
Entered the Australian chart: May 14, 2007
Peak position: number 10
No other top 100 entries
Before he was an internationally successful TV star in series as diverse as Neighbours, Terra Nova and Glee, South African-born Dean Geyer was a finalist in season four of Australian Idol. A former model, with some shirtless shots in his portfolio that Channel 10 tried to stop us running in TV WEEK, Dean was a serious contender for the Idol crown. Despite finishing third, he was also signed by Sony Music but ultimately only released this one single from debut album Rush





"Destination Calabria" by Alex Gaudino (featuring Crystal Waters)
Entered the Australian chart: June 11, 2007
Peak position: number 3
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Destination Unknown" (with Crystal Waters) (number 99 in 2004)
This insistent club smash was a mash-up of "Destination Unknown", which had scraped into the top 100 for Italian DJ/producer Alessandro Gaudino and club singer Crystal Waters in 2004, and instrumental track "Calabria" by Rune RK, a Danish DJ/producer who seems to have been missed out in the distribution of artist credits second time around. "That song with the saxophone" spent four weeks at number 3 behind different combinations of "Umbrella", "Big Girls Don't Cry" and "Dance Floor Anthem".





"That's Gold" by Paul "The Chief" Harragon
Entered the Australian chart: September 3, 2007
Peak position: number 8
No other top 100 entries
Up until now I'd been spared ever hearing this affront to music, which tied in with the former rugby league player's segment of the same name on The Footy Show and, at least, raised money for charityThankfully, Paul Harragon's take on Spandau Ballet's "Gold" was out of the top 100 within a month. My ears may never recover, however. 

 



"This Heart Attack" by Faker
Entered the Australian chart: November 5, 2007
Peak position: number 9
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "The Familiar/Enough" (number 62 in 2005)
By the late '00s, it was more or less unheard of for a song to spend six months working its way up to the top 10, but that's exactly how long it took "This Heart Attack" to reach its peak after being released in mid-October 2007. The breakthrough hit for Australian band Faker, who'd formed back in 1996, came fifth in the JJJ Hottest 100 at the start of 2008 - and although I like the indie rock original, I prefer the dance mixes by the likes of Grafton Primary and Miami Horror.





"Here I Am" by Natalie Gauci
Entered the Australian chart: December 3, 2007
Peak position: number 2
No other top 100 entries
Poor Natalie Gauci - she has so many credits to her name (besides being a one-hit wonder), but none of them positive. She was the first Australian Idol winner to see her winner's single peak at number 2 rather than number 1. Stan Walker's "Black Box" did the same, but then he had a further top 10 hit with 2011's "Loud" (among other top 50 entries), which means he's not on this list but Natalie is. 
She's also the only Idol champ not to release a follow-up single under her record deal and the only victor whose sole album released by Sony Music was the Winner's Journey collection of songs she performed on the show, which just happens to be the only album released by a winner immediately post-Idol not to go top 10. 
She's not, however, the only Idol to be eclipsed in the years since by their runner-up, in this case Matt Corby, who admitted his distaste for "Here I Am". The track, which was co-written by Lindy Robbins (who's penned tunes in the years since for Demi Lovato, Jason Derulo and David Guetta), is about as insipid a winner's single as you could hope for. Natalie finally got around to releasing new music - independently - in 2010, and has lurched from dance tracks to jazz releases since then.





"Naughty Girl" by Mr G
Entered the Australian chart: March 10, 2008
Peak position: number 7
No other top 100 entries
Even more shocking than some of this song's lyrics about schoolgirl Annabel Dickson (who, in comedy series Summer Heights High, died of a drug overdose) is the fact that the music video created for the single release features young kids miming them. But then at this point, comedian Chris Lilley could get away with just about anything - even tweens chanting "ecstasy". Released at the height of his characters' popularity, "Naughty Girl" features dialogue from attention-craving school teacher Mr G set to a thumping dance beat courtesy of Paul Mac. 





"I Don't Do Surprises" by Axle Whitehead
Entered the Australian chart: March 17, 2008
Peak position: number 8
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Anywhere" (number 77 in 2008)
He'd appeared back on the first season of Australian Idol, and despite not making the finals Axle Whitehead did remarkably well for himself, with this single released between his time as a co-host of Video Hits and a star on Home And Away. Thankfully involving no scat singing, the Coldplay-lite "I Don't Do Surprises" was co-written by Axle and benefitted from radio stations finally coming around to the idea of playing songs by former Idol contestants.





"Psycho Teddy" by Psycho Teddy
Entered the Australian chart: April 21, 2008
Peak position: number 5
No other top 100 entries
While I was spared having to relive Crazy Frog in Part 1 - even if that did mean accepting the fact that the animated act had more than one hit - there's no escaping this ringtone-inspired single, which emerged out of Australia as an obvious cash-in attempt. Thankfully, its chart tenure was brief, spending only six weeks in the top 100.





"From Little Things Big Things Grow (Get Up Stand Up version)" by The GetUp Mob
Entered the Australian chart: April 28, 2008
Peak position: number 4
No other top 100 entries
Another short-lived hit was this cover of the Paul Kelly & The Messengers song, which spent only three weeks in the top 100 in the wake of the Australian government's apology to the Stolen Generation on February 13, 2008. Featuring vocal input from Paul, Kev Carmody (who'd also previously recorded the song), John Butler, Missy Higgins and Dan Sultan, among others, the new recording was credited to The GetUp Mob, a reference to the similarly named activist group.





"My Delirium" by Ladyhawke
Entered the Australian chart: December 15, 2008
Peak position: number 8
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Paris Is Burning" (number 52 in 2008)
Just when it looked like nothing from Ladyhawke's excellent self-titled debut album was going to have any luck on the chart, fourth single "My Delirium" broke the curse that had caused "Back Of The Van", "Paris Is Burning" and "Dusk Till Dawn" to falter. Unfortunately, it was back to missing the top 50 with follow-up "Magic" and, although Pip Brown won two ARIA Awards in 2009 for her musical alter ego, she's yet to return to the singles chart.





"Rock & Roll" by Eric Hutchinson
Entered the Australian chart: January 19, 2009
Peak position: number 9
No other top 100 entries
Here's a song that owes its place on this list to primetime soap Packed To The Rafters, which had become known for its crowd-pleasing soundtrack albums and featured "Rock & Roll" in its 2008 season finale. Previously signed to Madonna's Maverick Records, Eric ended up self-releasing his Sounds Like This album, which was in turn picked up by Maverick's parent company, Warner Music.





"The Boy Does Nothing" by Alesha Dixon
Entered the Australian chart: July 13, 2009
Peak position: number 8
No other top 100 entries
In between her time as a member of Mis-teeq (biggest Australian hit: "Scandalous", number 9 in 2003) and as a judge on UK reality shows like Strictly Come Dancing (on which she'd also competed) and Britain's Got Talent, Alesha Dixon released this "Mambo No. 5"-style lead single from her second album, The Alesha Show. One of six top 20 hits for her at home in the UK, "The Boy Does Nothing" remains her only solo effort to do anything locally.





"According To You" by Orianthi
Entered the Australian chart: October 26, 2009
Peak position: number 8
No other top 50 entries
Next biggest single: "Shut Up And Kiss Me" (number 85 in 2010)
The sudden death of Michael Jackson in June 2009 resulted in two things happening on the Australian chart. Firstly, much of his back catalogue returned to the countdown, with a couple of tracks even peaking higher than they had originally. Secondly, the Australian guitarist scheduled to play on his This Is It tour saw her profile sky-rocket and her major label debut, Believe, released. Then 24 years old, Orianthi Panagaris was also a singer/songwriter and breakthrough single "According To You" fit in perfectly with the power pop of Avril Lavigne, Pink and Kelly Clarkson.





As with Part 1's list, some of these are missing from Spotify - but not always the ones you'd expect. Here's the playlist:






Still with me? That just leaves the two-hit wonders from the 2000s - including a Hollywood actress, a cartoon character, an Australian Idol winner and a singer/songwriter who resolutely refused to write us a love song.